Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Genealogy Books for Northeast Georgia

Recipes from Old Newspapers

Home
Clarke County Books
Winder, City of
Hancock County Books
Jefferson County Book
Jackson County Books
Wilkes County Books
Order Form
Sandy Ck. Pres. Ch. Minutes
Recipes (Old)
Remedies (Old)
Household Miscellanea


NOTE: These wonderful old recipes, transcribed verbatim from the old newspapers, contain interesting units of measure: "the size of an egg" and "one tumbler". A listing of those units of measure and their modern equivalents are at the end of the recipes.

BREADS

Bread Muffins. Take 4 or 5 slices of bakers’ bread, cut off the crusts, put into a pan, and pour over hot water, only just sufficient to soak the slices. Let stand an hour, drain off any liquor that you can, beat the mass smooth, mix in half a pint of sweet milk, 2 tablespoonfuls of sifted flour, a tablespoonful of melted butter, a little salt and three well beaten eggs. Have muffin rings, as well as baking pan, hot and buttered, and fill each two-thirds full. Bake brown in a quick oven. Eaten hot. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Delicious Light Tea Biscuit. Two quarts of best sifted flour, one pint of sweet milk, in which melt one quarter of a pound of butter, one teaspoon of salt in the milk, one teacup of fresh yeast. Make a hole in the center, pour in the yeast (well shaken), stir diligently with a fork. Let the milk, etc., be just blood-warm (no more), then knead as bread. Cut it across, through and through, with a knife. Let it rise 6 or 7 hours, as it may require. Take from the pan, knead it well, cut in small cakes and put to rise in pan an hour or more before baking. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 7, 1882, Vol. II, No. 7)

French Rolls. One pint of milk, one small cup of home-made yeast, (you can try bakers’,) flour enough to make a stiff batter; raise over night; in the morning add one egg, one tablespoon of butter, and flour enough to make it stiff to roll. Mix it well and let it rise, then knead it again, (to make it fine and white) roll out, cut with a round tin and fold over, put them in a pan quickly, and cover very closely. Set them in a warm place until they are very light, cook quickly, and you will have delicious rolls. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, March 17, 1882, Vol. II, No. 5.)

Honey Muffins. Take two cups of fine hominy, boiled and cold; beat it smooth; stir in three cups of sour milk, half a cup of melted butter, two teaspoonsful of salt and two tablespoonsful of white sugar; then add three eggs well beaten, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water, and one large cup of flour; bake quickly. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 7, 1882, Vol. II, No. 7)

Boiled Brown Bread.  Two cups of meal, 1 cup of flour, 1 tspn. of salt, 1 tspn. of soda, two-thirds up of molasses.  Put it into a greased pudding-boiler or tin pail; plunge into boiling water and boil three hours. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Delicious Bread. A friend who knows whereof she speaks, sends us the following as the receipt [sic] by which the celebrated Vienna bread was made that became so famous on the Centennial grounds for its deliciousness as to command four prices, indeed to sell for far more than it was worth.  Will not some of our good housewives try the receipt and inform us of their success?
    Sift in a tin pan 4 lbs. of flour, bank it up against the sides, pour in 1 qt. of milk and water, and mix into it enough flour to form a thick batter; then quickly and lightly add 1 pint of milk, in which is dissolved one ounce of salt and 1 ounces of yeast; leave the remainder of the flour against the sides of the pan; cover the pan with a cloth and set in a place free from draught for three-quarters of an hour; then mix in the rest of the flour until the dough will leave the bottom and sides of the pan, and let it stand 2 hours.
    Finally, divide the mass into 1 pound pieces, to be cut in turn into 12 parts each.  This gives square pieces about 3 inches thick, each corner of which is taken up and folded over to the centre, and then the cakes are turned over on a dough-board to rise for half an hour, when they are put into a hot oven that bakes them in 10 minutes.
    We suppose the ingredients may be divided into smaller proportions, so that a single one-pound loaf could be baked as well as 4 one-pound loaves. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, March 3, 1877, Vol. II, No. 38)

Corn Bread.  It is well known that nobody makes more delicious corn bread than the Negro woman down south.  One of them told an enquiring young lady how she does it, and for the benefit of our housekeeping readers, we give the receipt. [sic] Says Dinah: “Why, darlin’ sometimes gen’ally I takes a little meal, and sometimes gen’ally I takes a little flou’, an’ I kine o’ mixes ‘em up with some hot water, an’ I puts in eggs enuff and a little salt, an’ then I bakes it jist ‘bout enuff.  An’ you do so, jess so, honey, an’ you’ll make it as good as I do.”    (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 17, 1875 - Vol. I, No. 6.)

Hot Cross Buns. Three cups of sweet milk, one cup of years; four enough to make a stiff batter; set this as a sponge over night.  In the morning add one cup of sugar, one-half cup melted butter, one-half nutmeg; salt-spoonful of salt; four enough to roll out like biscuits; knead well and set to rise 5 hours.  Roll half an inch thick; cut into round cakes and put in the plan.  When they have stood half an hour make a cross on each one and put into the over instantly. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 9, 1880, Vol. V, No. 44.)

Milk Biscuit. Two pounds flour, one-fourth pound of lard or butter, one teacup of yeast, one teaspoonful of salt, one pint of milk; make a soft dough and set at ten o’clock; stir at three and mold into biscuits, adding more flour if necessary.  Let them rise until nearly tea time and bake twenty minutes. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, June 18, 1880, Vol. VI, No. 2.)

Raised Muffins. One quart milk, 4 eggs, 1 small teacup yeast, butter size of an egg, flour to make a thin batter; in the morning add one-half teaspoon soda if the dough is turned.  This rule makes three dozen muffins. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Simple and Delicious Muffins..  One quart flour, one tsp. salt, half gill yeast, one pint warmed milk, less two tablespoonfuls; mix at night, and beat until light; in the morning drop the well-risen dough in buttered cups. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 30, 1880, Vol. V, No. 47.)

Waffles. One pint cold boiled rice; thin it with cold milk, and add one egg, beat all together well; add a small piece of butter, and stir in flour enough to make a batter, stiff enough to bake. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)


CONDIMENTS

Fruit Jelly. One box of gelatine, rind of a lemon, one pint of cold water; allow this to stand one hour and a half; then add two and a half pints of boiling waters, two pounds of granulated sugar, one pint of any fruit syrup; stir gently until the sugar is dissolved, then pour into mould. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

Tomato Catsup. Half bushel or more of tomatoes, wash, cut out stems, break up and put over the fire in a brass kettle, then green peppers, two or three ripe ones, six medium sized onions, three large pieces of horseradish.  Cook together for three hours until it becomes thick, then strain through a coarse seive into a jar. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)


COOKIES

Ginger Crackers. Two quarts of flour, one pint of molasses, one pound of brown sugar, half a pound of lard, two ounces of ground ginger, and a teaspoonful of cloves.  Knead them a long time and roll very thin.  Bake over a steady strong fire. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 16, 1880, Vol. V, No. 45.)

Ginger Snaps. Take one pint of molasses, one teacup of butter, one spoonful of ginger, and one teaspoonful of saleratus, and boil all the ingredients tho-roughly; when nearly cold, add as much flour as can be rolled into the mixture. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Lemon Jumbles. One egg, one cup sugar, one-half cup of butter, three teaspoonfuls of milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda, and one of cream tartar, juice of two small lemons, and the grated rind of one; mix stiff. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Sand Hearts. Two pounds of flour, two pounds of sugar, one pound of butter, three eggs.  Make up into a dough, and work till the ingredients are well incorporated.  After rolling out and cutting into heart-shape, place the cakes on a pan and beat up one egg, spread some of it over with a feather, and then sprinkle with granulated sugar.  If a little coarse-grained, all the better, mixing with a finely powdered cinnamon. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 23, 1880, Vol. V, No. 46.)


DESSERTS

Tart Paste. Rub half a pound fresh butter into a pound of flour; add the yolk of an egg, a little lump of sugar, and enough milk to mix it property. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Lemon Meringue. Beat the yolks of 6 eggs with a patent beater until they are thick, add the juice of 2 lemons and their rind, grated, and a cup of sugar. Cook in a farina kettle. When the mixture begins to thicken, add the whites of the eggs, beaten till they stand alone. Line a deep dish with sponge cake; pour in the mixture, and cover all with the beaten whites of two eggs, and 4 spoonfuls of sugar. Brown in a quick over. This is a nice substitute for jelly cake. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Citron Custard. One lb. sugar, one half lb. butter, six eggs – whites and yolks beaten seperately.  Flavor with lemon or brandy and bake in rich crusts. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 17, 1875 - Vol. I, No. 6.)


CAKES

Christmas Fruit-Cake. Four coffee cups sifted flour; three cups of nice brown sugar; two cups of butter, eight eggs; two pounds raisons, stoned and chopped; two pounds currants, washed and dried; half pound of citron cut in thin slips; one nutmeg; teaspoonful each of cloves and cinnamon; one teaspoonful soda; cream, butter, and sugar; add yolks of eggs well beaten; then the spice, then the flour in which the soda has been thoroughly sifted; next add the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth and last of all the fruit dredged with flour to prevent sinking. Bake with care in a moderate oven and you have a cake which will keep for months. It should be baked at least one week before needed for use. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Butter Sponge Cake. Fourteen eggs, the weight of the same in sugar, eight ounces of flour, six of butter, and the juice of three lemons. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Cocoanut Cake. Four cupfuls flour, two cupfuls sugar, one cupful milk, five eggs, one cupful butter, one teaspoonful soda, two of cream tartar, one-half of the cocoanut put in the cake, the other half put with the whites of three eggs and one half cupful sugar put b (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

Coffee Cake. Four eggs, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 cut butter, 1 cut molasses, 1 cup cold coffee, lb. raisins, nutmeg, 2 teaspoons cloves, 1 teaspoon soda, 4 cups flour. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Corn Cake. One cupful of Indian meal, 1 cupful flour, 1 tspn. cream-tartar, tspn. saleratus, a piece of butter the size of an egg, 2 eggs, 1 cupful of milk, and less than a cupfull of sugar. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Cream Cake. Four tea-cups flour, three of sugar, one of sweet cream, one of butter and five eggs; sift two teaspoonsful of cream tartar and one of soda into the flour and use any flavoring preferred.  Rub the butter and sugar together, mix in the other ingredients, beat well, and bake as pound cake. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 17, 1875 - Vol. I, No. 6.)

Indian Cake.  One pint of sweet milk, one egg, two large spoonfuls of molasses, two of melted butter, one and one half cups of corn meal, one cup of flour, one tsp. cream tartar, one-half tsp. of soda, a little salt; mix together, then chop some sweet apples about the size of raisins, and stir in and bake. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 16, 1880, Vol. V, No. 45.)

Lemon Cream. Take a pint of thick sweet cream, and put to it the yolks of two eggs well beaten, four ounces of fine sugar, and thin rind of one lemon; boil it up; then stir it till almost cold; put the juice of a lemon in a dish or bowl, and pour the cream upon it, stirring it till quite cold. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, June 18, 1880, Vol. VI, No. 2.)

Home Cup Cake..Two cups sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of milk, three tablespoonfuls cream tartar, one of soda, flour to make it proper consistency. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 23, 1880, Vol. V, No. 46.)

Puff Cake. Two cups of sugar; one cup of butter; three beaten eggs; one cup of milk; one teaspoonful of soda and two of cream-of-tartar; three cups of flour.  Bake in small pan. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

White Mountain Cake. One pound of flour, one of sugar, and half a cup of butter; six eggs, beaten separately, one cup of sweet milk, a teaspoon of soda, and two teaspoonfuls of creat tartar. Flavor to the taste, and use fruit if desired. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Hickorynut Cake. Two cupfuls sugar, two thirds cupful butter, three and one-half cupfuls flour, whites of 4 eggs well beaten, 3 tspns. baking powder mixed with flour, one cupful sweet milk, 1 pints of sliced (not chopped) hickory nuts.  This makes two rather small loaves.

Rice Cup Cakes. Take a half pound of the best rice; cook until thoroughly done; turn into cups; when cold, place on a dish and serve with milk, a little granulated sugar, some grated nutmeg, and a tablespoon of any kind of kelly or preserved fruits, such as blackberries. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

Sponge Cake. Ten eggs, two cups sugar, two cups flour, two teaspoonfuls cream tarter and one of soda.  Beat the yolk of the eggs well, add the well frothed whites and the flour alternately; flavor, and bake quick. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 17, 1875 - Vol. I, No. 6.)

Economical Jelly Cake.. One egg, one cup of sugar, one tablespoon melted butter, one-fourth cup of sweet milk, one teacupful cream tartar, one and one-half cup of flour. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 7, 1882, Vol. II, No. 7)


CANDIES

Cream Candy. A pound of sugar, a half teaspoonful water, a half teaspoonful vinegar, a tablespoon of butter; boil 15 minutes, and stir it up only once at the first. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 9, Vol. V, No. 44.)


CANNING

Pickled Onions. One peck of small onions; peel and lay them in salt water, strong enough to bear an egg, for three days; take them out and put them to soak in fresh water for one day; then put them in milk; when come to a boil, take them out and drain until dry; place them in jars with red pepper pods; boil the vinegar and spices together; when lukewarm pour it on the onions; in a few days they are fit for use. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, May 18, 1878, Vol. III, No. 49)

Brandied Peaches. Four pounds of white sugar, dissolved with a very little water; let it come to a boil.  Add four pounds of peeled peaches; let them boil five minutes.  Skim out the peaches, and let the syrup boil 20 minutes.  Add one pint of the best white brandy, and remove at once from the fire.  Place the fruit in glass jars that have been rolled in hot water.  Pour on the hot syrup.  When cool, seal up. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, May 18, 1878, Vol. III, No. 49)


EGGS

Buttered Eggs. Four eggs, well beaten, three tablespoonfuls of cream or milk, a little grated tongue or beef, pepper and salt, 3 ounces of butter; put in a stew pan until quite hot, then add the eggs; stir all the time until quite thick.  Have a slice of bread ready, toasted and buttered, spread the mixture upon it, and send it to table very hot. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 9, 1880, Vol. V, No. 44.)

Omelet.  Four eggs, whites beaten separately; one large tablespoon flour, one cupful milk, little salt; cook slowly and cover while cooking. The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, April 20, 1878, Vol. III, No. 44.)


MEATS (Fish, Beef, Pork, etc.)

Curing Hams..The National Live Stock Journal asserts that hams have a decidedly better flavor, and the meat retains a more natural color when nothing but plain salt is used in the curing. If the work of salting is carefully attended to the hams, when cured with salt alone, will be ready for smoking at from six weeks to two months, according to the size of the hams. Saltpetre has a tendency to harden and redden the meat. It undoubtedly hastens the curing process, but it does so at the expense of the flavor. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45.)

F
owl and Rice Croquettes..Put half pound of rice into one quart of stock, and let it boil very gently for half an hour, then add three ounces of butter, and simmer it till quite dry and soft; when cold make it into balls, hollow out the inside, and fill with minced fowl made rather thick, cover over with rice, dip the balls into egg, sprinkle them with bread crumbs, and fry a nice brown; dish them, and garnish with fried parsley; oysters, white sauce, or a little cream may be stirred into the rice before it cools. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Chicken Salad..Two chickens weighing 6 pounds, two bunches of celery. Boil the chickens in very little water; cut in large pieces; dry the celery without washing; take 2 yelks [sic] of hard-boiled eggs, the yelk of one raw egg, and mix them together, with one teaspoonful of dry mustard; add slowly half of a large bottle of oil, the juice of one lemon, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, teaspoonful of salt, little red pepper; put in a cold place just before using; mix it through the chicken; also, two hard-boiled eggs cut fine, 1 tablespoonful of capers, and 6 olives, cut fine; save little dressing for the top. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Beef Cakes. Take some cold roast beef, that which is underdone is best, and mince it very fine; mix with grated bread crumbs and a little chopped onion and parsley; season it with pepper and salt;, and moisten it with some beef dripping and walnut sauce; some scraped cold tongue or grated ham will be found an improvement; form it into broad flat cakes, and spread a layer of mashed potatoes thinly on the top and bottom of each; lay a small bit of butter on the top of every cake; place them on a dish and set them in an oven to brown. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 9, 1880, Vol. V, No. 44.)

Fried Chicken.. Put one pint of cream into a frying pan large enough to hold a chicken, and set it over a moderate fire until it begins to color; then lay into it one chicken, nicely dressed and cut in joints, and fry until the underside is nicely browned; when the cream acquires a rich brown hue, dip enough to serve as sauce for the dish, and set it aside to keep hot.  Season the chicken with pepper and salt, and turn it over in the pan.  Let it brown equally all over.  Do not let the cream burn.  When done, lay it upon a flat dish and pour the cream into the center.  At. Const. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, April 20, 1878, Vol. III, No. 44.)

Domestic Sausage.. Two pounds of lean pork, two pounds of veal, two pounds of beef suet, the peel of half a lemon, one grated nutmeg, one teaspoonful of black pepper, one of cayenne pepper, 5 teaspoonfuls of salt, three teaspoonfuls of sweet marjoram and thyme mixed, two tsp. of sage and the juice of a lemon.  Stuff in cases or skins if you prefer. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 16, 1880, Vol. V, No. 45.)

To Make Sausages.. Take tender pieces of fresh pork, chop them very fine, with some of the leaf fat, in the proportion of three pounds of lean to one pound of fat.  Season very highly with pepper & salt, and a small quantity of dried sage rubbed to a powder.  Fry in cakes. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 23, 1880, Vol. V, No. 46.)

Fish Fritters. Take the remains of any fish which has been served the preceding day, remove all the bones and mince fine; add equal quantities of bread crumbs and mashed potatoes; stir in two beaten eggs; season with pepper and salt; add enough cream to make the mass of the proper consistence to mould into little balls, and fry them in boiling lard. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., Friday, January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47)

Fish Preservation. Fish may be preserved from dying and putrafaction in warm weather, by introducing into their throats a paste made of soft bread and brandy, and wrapping them in straw.  A little brandy should be poured into the mouth after the paste has been put in, and great care taken not to wound the fish.  They will live in this condition ten or twelve days; and then, after being placed in fresh water, they in a few hours recover from their stupor, and are as lively as ever.  (Hancock Advertiser, Mount Zion, GA, Oct. 9, 1827)

Fried Frogs. Throw the legs into boiling water for five minutes.  Take them out and put them in cold water, and wipe them until dry.  Have some batter make as follows: In one pint of cream the yolk of an egg slightly beaten.  Have ready some baked bread crumbs.  Fry in the very best of butter to a slight golden brown. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

Stewed Kidneys. Lay them in salt and water for a few minutes.  Cut off the outside, or meat, and chop up in small pieces.  Put them in a stew pan with a little water, and cook until tender; then add pepper, salt, butter and little thickening flour; last of all a glass of port wine, and you have a dish for an epicure. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 16, 1880, Vol. V, No. 45.)


PIES & PUDDINGS:

Pan Puddings. This is a New England dish, and is nice where appetites are expansive. Take three cups of fine rye meal, three cups of Indian meal, one egg and three tablespoonfuls of molasses; add a little salt and allspice, and enough rich sweet milk to make a batter, and enough to drop from a spoon. Fry to a good brown in hot lard. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Corn Meal Pudding. Two cups of Indian meal, one cup of flour, three cups of sour milk, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, a tablespoon ful of melted butter, a little salt, any spice you please, and a large teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water. Beat the ingredients free from lumps, adding the soda last. Pour into a buttered mold or tin pail and boil two hours without stopping. Eat with liquid sauce or maple syrup.
(Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Rice Pudding. The rice pudding is beyond comparison the best ever made, in spite of the fact that it is the cheapest. The secret of its perfection is the long cooking it gets. For a six o’clock dinner the rice and milk should be put on the stove early in the forenoon. The best thing to cook it in is a double kettle. Add to a quart of milk 2 heaping tablespoonfuls of rice, let it simmer on the back of the stove – it must never boil – until a couple of hours before dinner. It will then be a thick creamy substance. Then salt and sweeten to taste, put it into a pudding dish and bake in a moderate oven until it is of a jelly-like thickness and the top is slightly browned. It can be eaten either hot or cold. If the latter is prefered, the pudding may be made the day before, if that is most convenient. If desired, a flavoring may be added. This is emphatically the perfect pudding of its kind. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

Apple Custard Pie..Scald the milk and let it cool. Grate some sweet apples. Take two-thirds of a cupful of powdered sugar, four well beaten eggs, one cupful of milk, one-fourth of a nutmeg. Line an earthen [sic] pie dish with a rich crust and let it bake. Then fill with the custard and let it take for half an hour. To be eaten cold. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

A Nice Plain Pudding. One quart of flour; butter the size of an egg; a pint of milk; two table spoonfuls of baking powder; one cup of cut raisins. Steam one hour in a two-quart dish. Boil a pint of milk, add sugar, two table spoonfuls of flour and flavoring for the sauce.
     For a good or easily made pudding sauce take one tablespoonful of butter, two tablespoonfuls of flour, two thirds of a cup of sugar. Pour hot water over these, stir well and boil until thick; flavor with lemon, wine or with nutmeg and a teaspoonful of vinegar. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Lemon Pie..Grate the rind off a fine lemon, and express the juice.  Beat the yolks of four eggs, add to them one cupful of cream or rich milk, one tsp. of flour, and the lemon [juice].  Beat the mixture well, and bake in a crust.  While it is baking beat the [egg] whites stiff with four tablespoonfuls of sifted white sugar.  When the pie is baked, spread the whites on smoothly, and set in the oven to brown slightly.  This quantity will make two small pies. [Note: This recipe left out the sugar, so please add sugar to taste!] (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 16, 1880, Vol. V, No. 45.)

Old-Fashioned Tapioca Pudding..Two eggs, one quart milk, one cup tapioca; spices of nutmeg and cinnamon to taste; also sugar and bit of salt, and small teaspoonful of butter, melted.  Wash and soak the tapioca in very little water till rather tender; then put it in the milk, and place on back of the stove and soak one hour; then melt butter in dish and pour in the beaten eggs, milk well sweetened, and spice; bake one hour quite slowly. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 30, 1880, Vol. V, No. 47.)

Pumpkin Pie.. As made 100 years ago, with this difference that than they made a big panful. I will give you ingredients for one pie. One coffee cupful of stewed pumpkins; two of milk; a small handful of flour; two teaspoonfuls of ginger; a dust of allspice or nutmeg on top – no eggs. Bake in a very quick oven. The crust will not be soggy if the oven be hot enough on the bottom. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Rhubarb Pie. Rhubarb ought not to be stewed for pies, but cut the sticks in small pieces; fill your dishes, already filled with the lower crust, and cover thick with sugar.  After placing on a thin lid, bake in a moderate oven. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, July 6, 1878, Vol. IV, No. 4)

Baked Indian Pudding.. Three quarts of milk, 6 heaping iron-spoonsful [sic] of meal, 3 eggs, 1 coffee-cup of molasses, 1 of sugar, butter size of an egg, 1 teaspoonful each of Flavoring Extract of Nutmeg, Ginger, Cloves and Cinnamon, salt, 1 coffee-cup seeded raisins. Boil half the milk, wet the meal to thin battler with the balance of the milk, and stir into the boiling milk; when cool, add the other articles and bake slowly 3 or more hours. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 7, 1882, Vol. II, No. 7)

Tapioca Cream.. Put two tablespoonfuls of tapioca to soak in cold water; set it on the stove, and when thoroughly dissolved, pour in a quart of milk. When this begins to boil stir in the yolks of two eggs well beaten, with a cup of sugar. When this boils stir in the whites, beaten to a stiff froth, and take it immediately from the fire. Flavor to taste. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 7, 1882, Vol. II, No. 7)


POTATOES

Nice Breakfast Dish.. Cold mashed potatoes made into little balls and slightly flattened; dip them into an egg slightly, so as to mix the yolk and white; roll them in cracker crumbs.  Fry them in hot lard or butter.  Send to the table hot. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

Potato Balls, or Croquettes. Four large, mealy, potatoes, cold, mash them in a pan with two tablespoonfuls of fresh melted butter, a pinch of salt, a little pepper, one tablespoonful of cream, and the beaten yolk of one egg: rub it together for about 5 minutes, or until very smooth; shape the mixture into balls about the size of walnut rolls, dip them into an egg well beaten, and then into the finest sifted bread crumbs; fry them in boiling lard. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 23, 1880, Vol. V, No. 46.)

Potato Pone. This is a favorite dish in the West India Islands. Wash, peel and grate two pounds of potatoes; add four ounces each of sugar and butter melted, one teaspoonful each of salt and pepper; mix well together; place in a baking dish and put into a quick oven until it is done and become nicely browned. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Potatoes Roasted Under Meat. Half boil potatoes; drain the water, put them into an earthen dish or small tin pan, under meat roasting; baste them often with the drippings; turn them, to brown nicely on all sides; take them up in a separate dish. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 30, 1880, Vol. V, No. 47.)

Stewed Potatoes. Boil the potatoes and cut in thick slices; take half a tablespoonful of flour, a little sale and butter and chopped parsley, etc.; a tea-cupful of milk; but them together in a saucepan and let them stand about 20 minutes. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 9, 1880, Vol. V, No. 44.)


SAUCES

Egg Sauce. Boil three eggs hard, cut them into small squares and mix them in good butter sauce; make very hot and squeeze in some lemon juice before serving. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)


SOUPS

Chicken Cream Soup.  Boil an old fowl with an onion in four quarts of cold water until there remains but two quarts.  Take it out and let it get cold.  Cut off the whole of the breast and chop very fine.  Mix with the pounded yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, and rub through a colander.  Cool, skim and strain the soup into a soup-pot.  Season; add the chicken and egg mixture; simmer ten minutes and pour into the tureen.  Then add a small cup of boiling milk. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, April 30, 1880, Vol. V, No. 47.)


VEGETABLES:

Vegetables and Salads. Upon the washing of green vegetables for salads much of their excellence depends; they should be shaken about without breaking, in a large pan of cold water well salted, since the action of the salt will destroy all the minute inhabitants of their fresh green covers, and, once dead, from sheer force of gravity they will fall to the bottom of the water. When the salad plants are free from sand and insects they should be shaken, without breaking their leaves, in a colander, a wire basket, or a dry napkin until no moisture adheres to them; then they may be used at once or kept until wanted in a very cold, dark place. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, Ga., January 13, 1882, Vol. I, No. 47.)

To Cook Cabbage. First boil it under tender, in water enough to cover it; then pour the water off, some milk with an egg beat up and thicken with a large spoonful of flour is then added; let it stew about 5 minutes, and it is done. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, April 20, 1878, Vol. III, No. 44.)

To Cook Cabbage. Cut the cabbage fine as for cold slaw, put it in a stew-pan with cold water and a little salt. Cover it closely and cook till nearly done. Then pour off the water, pour on milk or cream, add butter and pepper and cook till thoroughly done. This makes a delicious dish. (Jackson Herald, Jefferson, GA, Friday, December 30, 1881, Vol. I, No. 45)

Corn Oysters. Six ears of grated corn, one half cup of sweet milk, three tablespoons of flour, salt and pepper.  Fry it in lard. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Friday, August 22, 1879, Vol. V, No. 11)

To Preserve Corn
. Take good corn, boil until the milk is killed; when cold cut from the ear and put in a stone jar; allow one pint of salt for three pints of corn; put in a layer of salt and one of corn until the jar is full; when opened for use, remove the top; soak till fresh; then season as you would fresh corn; add one tablespoonful of white sugar, and cook in milk or cream. (The Forest News, Jefferson, GA, Saturday, May 18, 1878, Vol. III, No. 49)
 
MEASUREMENTS
 
The majority of the recipes listed above were taken from old newspapers in the 1800s. Measurements used in those days were somewhat different from today’s standardized units of measure.
In the event you want to try some of the recipes (at your own risk!),
the following table gives the modern equivalents for the period measurements used in the recipes.

Many of the measurements listed below were found in the old cookbook,
The Advance Club Cook Book, published in Wyoming, Ohio in 1915.

1 cupful raisins = pound
2 cupfuls granulated sugar = 1 pound
2-1/2 cupfuls powdered sugar = 1 pound
1 tablespoon butter = 1 ounce
1 cup butter = 1/2 pound or 8 ounces
1 pint butter = 2 cups or 1 pound
2 cupfuls solid butter = 1 pound
Butter the size of a walnut = 2 heaping teaspoons or 1 ounce
Butter the size of an egg = 1/3 cup or 2 ounces
Butter the size of a goose egg = 3/4 stick, 3/8 cup, or 3 ounces
Butter the size of a hickory nut = 1 heaping teaspoon or 1/2 ounce
4 cups flour = 1 pound or 1 quart
4 cupfuls liquid = 1 quart
4 cupfuls flour = 1 pound = 1 quart
1 cupful flour makes 1-1/2 cupfuls when sifted
1 heaping quart of sifted flour = 1 pound
1 rounded tablespoon flour = 1/2 ounce, or one modern tablespoon
3 cupfuls cornmeal = 1 pound
1-1/2 pints cornmeal = 1 pound
1 dash (liquid) = a few drops
1 dash of pepper = 3 good shakes
10 eggs should be 1 pound
1 gill = 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
1/2 gill = 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
1 kitchen cup = 1 cup or 8 ounces
1 pinch = 1 dash = Less than 1/8 teaspoon
1 pint = 16 ounces or 2 cups
1 pint of liquid = 1 pound
1 pint packed chopped meat = 1 pound
1 teacupful = 1 cup
1 tumbler = 1 cup or 8 ounces
60 drops = 1 teaspoon
4 teaspoonfuls liquids = 1 tablespoon = ounce
3 teaspoonfuls dry material = 1 tablespoon
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup = 2 ounces
4 tablespoonfuls liquid = 1 wine glass = gill
8 tablespoonfuls liquid = cupful = 1 gill
16 tablespoons  liquid = 1 cupful = 2 gills = pint
12 tablespoonfuls dry material = 1 cupful
1 saltspoonful = 1/4 teaspoon
4 saltspoonfuls = 1 teaspoon
1 peck = 8 quarts or 2 gallons
1 bushel = 4 pecks or 8 gallons
1 package yeast = 2 teaspoons
pottle = 2 quarts or 4 pounds